BURIAL CHURCHES OF THE POPES

L'AQUILA, BASILICA OF SANTA MARIA DI COLLEMAGGIO/ITALY
(L’Aquila, Basilica di Santa Maria di Collemaggio, Piazzale Collemaggio):
Pope Celestine V (+1296)
Buried firstly in the Church of St Anthony in Ferentino, where his sacrophagus has been preserved. Reburied in 1327 in the Church of St Agatha in Ferentino, where a plaque from 1666 commemorating the burial is still kept. Later translated to the Basilica of Santa Maria di Collemaggio in L'Aquila and buried in a silver coffin placed in the marble mausoleum executed in 1517 by Girolamo da Vicenza. The silver coffin had been stolen in 1529 by order of Prince of Orange, Philibert of Châlon. A new silver coffin had been made in 1646 but it was, too, stolen in 1799 by the French. In the 19th c. papal remains were buried in another, much modest coffin. In 1988 the remains of Pope Celestine V had been stolen by unknown perpetrators, but were found two days later. The tomb had been badly damaged in the 2009 earthquake. The coffin containing papal remains was buried in the rubble, but eventually recovered. Since 2009 the reliquary containing the remains of Pope Celestine V has been safeguarded in miscellaneous churches of the region, most recently in the Cathedral of Vasto (February 2010).
The heart of Pope Celestine V was presented to the convent of Poor Clares in Ferentino by cardinal Nicola Ludovisi in 1683.


The tomb of Pope Celestine V and the Basilica of S. Maria di Collemaggio in L'Aquila. ©ARB



AREZZO, CATHEDRAL OF SAINTS PETER AND DONATUS/ITALY
(Arezzo, Cattedrale di S. Pietro e S. Donato, Piazza del Duomo):


The Cathedral of Arezzo. ©ARB

Pope Gregory X (+1276)
Initially buried in a Gothic marble sarcophagus executed in the 14th century and remodelled in 1807. Later his remains were reburied in a glass coffin on the left side of the High Altar.


The cenotaph and the tomb of Pope Gregory X. ©ARB



AVIGNON, CATHEDRAL/FRANCE (Avignon, Cathédrale de Notre-Dame-des-Doms, Place du Palais):


The Cathedral of Notre Dame in Avignon. ©ARB

01. Pope John XXII (+1334)
The lavish Gothic tomb of Pope John XXII had been destroyed by the Jacobins in 1793. Remains of the tomb were restored in 1825 and in 1840.

02. Pope Benedict XII (+1342)
Buried in the Cathedral of Avignon in a suptuous tomb executed by Jean Lavenier. The tomb had been partially demolished in 1689 and relotated in 1765. Almost entirely destroyed during the French Revolution. Reconstructed in 1828. Presently the tomb is kept in the Calvet Museum in Avignon and bears a Latin inscription:
HIC IACET
BENEDICTVS PAPA XII
OBIIT
DIE XXV APRILIS
ANNO MCCCXLII



BAMBERG, CATHEDRAL/GERMANY (Bamberger Dom, Domplatz 5):
Pope Clement II (+1047)
Buried in a marble sarcophagus executed in the 13th or in the 14th century. The tomb was opened twice: in 1741 and in 1942. The original lid of the sarcophagus featuring an effigy of the pope lying in state, was replaced in 1741 with a new one bearing the following Latin inscription:
R. MVS. IN CHRO PATER
ET DNS D. SVIDGERVS A MAYENDORFF SAXO ET EPS
BAMB. POSTEA
SVMM. PONT. CLEM. 2DVS DICT. OBIIT ROMAE 10 OCTOB. AN. 1047


The Cathedral of Bamberg and the tomb of Pope Clement II. ©ARB



CASSINO, BASILICA OF THE ABBEY OF MONTE CASSINO/ITALY
(Cassino, Basilica dell'Abbazia di Montecassino, Via Montecassino):
Pope Victor III (+1087)
Buried in the abbey church. In 1944, prior to the Battle of Monte Cassino, his remains had been transerred to Rome and laid to rest in the Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls. They were returned to Monte Cassino after WW2 had ended and reburied in the abbey church after its restauration was concluded in 1956. The papal remains were interred, like before the war, under the altar in the fourth chapel on the left side of the abbey church.


The Basilica of the Monte Cassino Abbey and the tomb of Pope Victor III. ©ARB



CHAISE-DIEU, ABBEY OF LA CHAISE-DIEU/FRANCE (Abbaye de La Chaise-Dieu, Place de la Mairie):
Pope Clement VI (+1352)
Firstly buried in the Cathedral of Avignon, but in 1353 translated to the Abbey of La Chaise-Dieu and buried in a lavish marble sarcophagus. His tomb was desecrated by the Huguenots in 1562. The papal corpse had been thrown into a bonfire, but the remains were later saved and reburied in the damaged tomb of which only the sarcophagus with the effigy of pope lying in state has been preserved.



CLUNY, ABBEY/FRANCE (Abbaye de Cluny, Place de l'Abbaye):
Pope Gelasius II (+1119)
Buried in the abbey church in a marble sarcophagus. The tomb has not been preserved. It was destroyed by the Jacobins in 1790.


The Abbey of Cluny



FERRARA, BASILICA OF ST GEORGE THE MARTYR/ITALY
(Ferrara, Basilica Cattedrale di San Giorgio Martire, Piazza Trento Trieste 9):
Pope Urban III (+1187)
The original tomb had been thought lost, but in 1305 it was found. In 1458 the remains of Pope Urban III were reburied in a new marble tomb. In 1636 it was relocated somewhere else in the cathedral. The papal tomb had been destroyed during extensive rebuilding of the cathedral in the 18th century. The remains of Pope Urban III were interred somewhere inside the cathedral and all what is left is a marble epitaph with papal likeness and Latin inscription below it erected by G. B. Boffa.


The Cathedral of Ferrara and the cenotaph of Pope Urban III. ©ARB



FLORENCE, CATHEDRAL/ITALY (Firenze, Cattedrale di Santa Maria del Fiore, Piazza del Duomo):
Formerly the Church of Santa Reparata which was demolished to make room for the present cathedral.



The Cathedral of Florence
(reproduced courtesy of Ms Małgorzata Kosmala)

01. Pope Stephen IX [X] (+1058)
The tomb has not been preserved. The remains of Pope Stephen IX [X] had been found in 1357 when the Church of St Reparata was being demolished to make room for the new cathedral, but later they were lost again.

02. Pope Nicholas II (+1061)
The tomb has not been preserved.



GROTTAFERRATA, MONASTERY/ITALY (Abbazia di Grottaferrata, Corso del Popolo 128):


The Monastery of Grottaferrata and the tomb of Pope Benedict IX. ©ARB

Pope Benedict IX (+1055/56)
The tomb of this pope had been considered lost until 1739 when it was discovered under the pavement of the abbey church. The slab of the tomb had been then moved and placed on the wall of the church over a Latin epitaph commemorating Pope Benedict IX. In the immediate proximity of the original tomb a white marble plaque was placed reading in Latin:
SEPULCRUM
BENEDICTI. IX.
P. M.


The epitaph of Pope Benedict IX. ©ARB



MARSEILLE, ABBEY OF ST VICTOR/FRANCE (Marseille, Abbaye de St-Victor, Rue de l'Abbaye):


The Abbey of St Victor in Marseille and the tomb of Pope Urban V. ©ARB

Pope Urban V (+1370)
The tomb has been reconstructed. Urban V had been buried in the Church of St Martial in Avignon. In 1372 his remains were translated to the Abbey of St Victor in Marseille and buried in a sarcophagus. Later the sarcophagus had been relocated inside the cathedral and replaced by another one, which in turn was destroyed during the French Revolution. His empty tomb in Avignon, too, had been destroyed, only the statue of Urban V was saved from the tomb.



NAPLES, CATHEDRAL OF ST JANUARIUS/ITALY (Napoli, Duomo di San Gennaro, Via Duomo 147):
Pope Innocent IV (+1254)
Buried in the old cathedral of Naples and translated to the new structure of the cathedral in 1318 by archbishop Uberto d'Ormont. The papal tomb was refashioned on several occasions. It features the effigy of Pope Innocent IV lying in state. Above it there are two epitaphs flanked by papal arms and topped with effigies of Our Lady holding baby Jesus and the Pope kneeling before them. The tomb had been opened in 1806 and papal remains were found inside it.


The Cathedral of Naples. The tomb of Pope Innocent IV. ©ARB



NONANTOLA, ABBEY/ITALY (Abbazia di Nonantola, Piazza Abbazia):
Pope Adrian III (+885)
Initially buried in the apse of the abbey church, but in 1914 his remains were reburied in a red marble sarcophagus under the high altar in the crypt of the church. It bears a Latin inscription:
HADRIANI III
PONT MAX
OSSA MIRIFICA


The Abbey of Nonantola and the tomb of Pope Adrian III. ©ARB



PERUGIA, BASILICA OF ST DOMINIC/ITALY (Perugia, Basilica di San Domenico, Piazza Giordano Bruno):


Perugia, the Basilica of St Dominic. ©ARB

Pope Benedict XI (+1304)

Firstly interred under the pavement of the church, reburied in 1700 in a lavish Gothic sarcophagus probably executed by Giovanni Pisano. The sarcophagus had been moved from the ancient Church of St Stephen in 1700. It is flanked by two memorial plaques, a Mediaeval one and the other from 1700 commemorating the relocation of the monument. In 1959 the papal relics were laid to rest in a reliquiary placed next to the sarcophagus. Below the reliquiary there is a Latin inscription which reads:
OSSA BEATI
BENEDICTI PAPAE XI.


The cenotaph and the reliquiary containing the relics of Pope Benedict XI. ©ARB



PERUGIA, CATHEDRAL OF ST LAWRENCE/ITALY (Perugia, Duomo di San Lorenzo, Piazza 4. Novembre):


The Cathedral of Perugia. ©ARB


01. Pope Urban IV (+1264)
02. Pope Martin IV (+1285)
The original tombs exist no longer. Only a fragment of Urban IV's epitaph has been preserved in the Musei Civici in Perugia. The remains of popes Urban IV and Martin IV have been buried in a common tomb since 1615. A marble plaque on their tomb has a Latin inscription which reads:
OSSA
TRIVM ROMANORVM PONTIFICVM
QVI PERVSIÆ OBIERVNT
INOCEN. III. VRBAN. IV. MARTI. IV
A MCCXVI A MCCLXVI A MCCLXXXII
AB HVIVS TEMPLI SACRARIO
HVC TRANSLATA
ANNO MDCXV
Until 1883 the remains of Pope Innocent III had been buried here, too. They were, however, translated to Rome.


The tomb of popes Urban IV and Martin IV
(reproduced courtesy of Mr Eugeniusz Kępiński)




PISA, CATHEDRAL/ITALY (Pisa, Duomo, Piazza del Duomo):
Pope Gregory VIII (+1187)
The tomb has not been preserved. Originally a marble tomb, richly adorned. The tomb and the papal remains were destroyed in the 1600 fire of the Cathedral.


The Cathedral of Pisa. ©ARB



RAVENNA, CHURCH OF SANTA MARIA DELLA ROTONDA-THE MAUSOLEUM OF THEODORIC/ITALY
(Ravenna, Chiesa di Santa Maria della Rotonda/Mausoleo di Teodorico, Via delle Industrie 14):
Pope Victor II (+1057)
The tomb has not been preserved.


The Mausoleum of Theodric (former Church of S. Maria della Rotonda). ©ARB



RECANATI, CATHEDRAL/ITALY (Recanati, Cattedrale San Flaviano, Via Brodolini):
Pope Gregory XII (+1417)
Buried in a stone sarcophagus featuring an effigy of the Pope and a Gothic inscription in Latin. Beneath it there is another Latin inscription added in 1793. The tomb had been opened in 1623 and the papal remains found intact. The original tomb had been much more impressive but several relocations of it carried out in the 18th c. diminished its appearance.


The Cathedral of Recanati. ©ARB



ROME, CHURCH OF SANT’AGNESE IN AGONE/ITALY
(Roma, Chiesa di Sant'Agnese in Agone, Piazza Navona):


Rome, the Church of Sant'Agnese in Agone and the cenotaph of Pope Innocent X. ©ARB

Pope Innocent X (+1655)
Firstly buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1677 translated to the Church of Sant'Agnese. After some time the coffin was laid to rest in a sealed vault next to the high altar. There is a following Latin inscription on the tomb:
A XP Ω
INNOCENTIVS. X. PAMPHILIVS
PONTIFEX. MAXIMVS
VIXIT. ANN. LXXX. MENS. VIII
PONTIFICATVS. SVI. ANN. X
MENS. III. DIE. XXIII
DECESSIT. VII. IDVS. IANVAR
AN. CHR. MDCLV
In 1730 a cenotaph of Pope Innocent X was raised over the main entrance to the church. It had been designed by Valvassori and executed by G. B. Maini. It features an effigy of the pope in full regalia, flanked by effigies of the Faith and the Might. Beneath there is a Latin insciption:
INNOCENTIVS X PAMPHILIVS
ROMANVS PONT. POT. MAX.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb of Pope Innocent X. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF SANT'ANDREA DELLA VALLE/ITALY
(Roma, Basilica di Sant’Andrea della Valle, Corso Vittorio Emanuele II):
01. Pope Pius II (+1464)
Firstly interred in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. A couple of years later a Renaissance memorial had been raised in the place of his burial. In 1614 the memorial was transferred to the Church of Sant'Andrea della Valle. The remains of the pope had been exhumed in 1608 and kept in a sarcophagus discovered during the demolishion of the old St Peter's. In 1623 they were, too, interred in Sant'Andrea della Valle. His viscera were buried in the Cathedral of San Ciriaco in Ancona.


Rome, the Basilica of Sant'Andrea della Valle and tombs of popes Pius II and Pius III. ©ARB

02. Pope Pius III (+1503)

Firstly interred in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. A couple of years later a Renaissance memorial, quite similar to that of Pius II, had been raised in the place of his burial. In 1614 the memorial was transferred to the Church of Sant'Andrea della Valle. The remains of the pope had been exhumed in 1608 and kept in a Roman sarcophagus until the translation and reburial in the Church of Sant'Andrea della Valle in 1623. The old, now empty, tomb of this pope is still kept in the Vatican Grottoes under St Peter's Basilica in Rome.


The cenotaph of Pope Pius III in the Vatican Grottoes. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF THE APOSTLES/ITALY
(Roma, Basilica dei Santi Apostoli, Piazza dei Santi Apostoli 51):


Rome, the Basilica of the Apostles and the site of the former tomb of Pope Clement XIV. ©ARB

Pope Clement XIV (+1774)

Firstly buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1802 translated and reburied in the cloister of the Basilica of the Apostles. The following Latin epitaph was placed on the tomb in 1863:
A XP Ω
HEIC SITVM EST IN PACE
CORPVS
CLEMENTIS XIV
PONTIFICIS MAXIMI
ORDINIS FRATR. MINOR. CONVENTVAL.
VENIA PII VII
Earlier, in 1787, a sumptuous Neoclassical, marble cenotaph by Antonio Canova had been raised in the Basilica over the sacristy door. It bears a simple Latin inscription:
CLEMENS XIIII
PONT. MAX.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb and the cenotaph of Pope Clement XIV. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF SANTA CROCE IN GERUSALEMME/ITALY
(Roma, Basilica di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme, Piazza di Santa Croce in Gerusalemme):
Pope Benedict VII (+983)
The tomb has not been preserved, but the original Latin epitaph can still be seen inside the Basilica next to the main entrance.


Rome, the Basilica of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme and the epitaph of Pope Benedict VII. ©ARB



ROME, CHURCH OF SANTA FRANCESCA ROMANA/ITALY
(Roma, Chiesa di Santa Francesca Romana/Santa Maria Nuova, Piazza Santa Francesca Romana):
Pope Gregory XI (+1378)
Buried in a simple sarcophagus which was expanded in 1584 by the addition of a marble monument surrounding the original sarcophagus. In the middle, just above it, there is a relief depicting the arrival of Pope Gregory XI in Rome in 1377. Below the sarcopgahus there is a Latin epitaph commemorating the construction of the new papal mausoleum in 1584.


Rome, the Church of Santa Francesca Romana and the tomb of Pope Gregory XI. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF ST JOHN LATERAN
(Roma, Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, Piazza di Porta San Giovanni):
All papal tombs had been destroyed in the 1308 fire of the basilica and remains of the poniffs were buried in a common tomb which still existed in 1648.


Rome, the Basilica of St John Lateran. ©ARB

01. Pope Leo V (+903)
Uncertain. The tomb has not been preserved.

02. Pope John X (+928)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

03. Pope Agapitus II (+955)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

04. Pope John XI (+935/936)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

05. Pope John XII (+964)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

06. Pope Silvester II (+1003)
The tomb, erected by Pope Sergius IV, has not been preserved. It was lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308. A cenotaph had been commissioned by Pope Alexander VII in the 17th c. It was a work of Francesco Borromini. It was, however, destroyed. The present marble cenotaph, commissioned by the Hungarian bishop Vilmos Fraknói in 1909 was executed by Gzila Nalder and József Damkó. It bears Latin inscriptions.

07. Pope John XVII (+1003)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

08. Pope Sergius IV (+1012)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308. The present cenotaph is a 17th century work of Francesco Borromini. It bears a Latin inscription.


Cenotaphs of popes Silvester II and Sergius IV. ©ARB

09. Pope Alexander II (+1073)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

10. Pope Paschal II (+1118)
Buried in a marble tomb in St John Lateran, as the burial in St Peter's in Rome was not allowed by the Imperial forces occupying Rome at the time. The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

11. Pope Callistus II (+1124)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

12. Pope Honorius II (+1130)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

13. Pope Celestine II (+1144)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

14. Pope Lucius II (+1145)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

15. Pope Anastasius IV (+1154)
The tomb has not been preserved. The porphyry sarcophagus of Saint Helen, once used for burial of Pope Anastasius IV, is now kept in the Vatican Museums.


Cenotaph of Pope Alexander III

16. Pope Alexander III (+1181)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308. A marble cenotaph with Latin inscription by Francesco Borromini was raised to commemorate Pope Alexander III in the 17th c. It had been commissioned by Pope Alexander VII.

17. Pope Clement III (+1191)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

18. Pope Celestine III (+1198)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

19. Pope Innocent III (+1216)
Buried firstly in the Cathedral of Perugia. His original tomb had been destroyed in the 16th century and papal remains were laid in a metal box and kept in the sacristy. In 1615 reburied in a pink marble sarcophagus commissioned by bishop Comitoli. The tomb was opened in 1883. In the same year Pope Leo XIII had the remains of Innocent III translated to Rome and buried in a sarcophagus in the Basilica of St John Lateran executed by Giuseppe Luchetti in 1891. It bears the following Latin inscription:
LEO XIII INNOCENTIO III MDCCCXCI


Tombs of popes Innocent III and Martin V. ©ARB

20. Pope Innocent V (+1276)
The tomb has not been preserved. Probably lost in the fire of the basilica in 1308.

21. Pope Martin V (+1431)
Buried in a tomb with a richly adorned broze lid featuring Pope Martin V lying in state and a Latin inscription. A work of Simone di Giovanni Ghini. In 1853 the tomb had been opened and relocated to its present site. It is covered with a glass screen for protection.

22. Pope Clement XII (+1740)
Two years after his burial in St Peter's in Rome he was translated to the Basilica of St John Lateran and buried in the vault of the Cappella Corsini. On his grave there is the following Latin inscription:
D. O. M.
OSSA CLEMENTIS XII P. M. QVAE E VATIC. BASILIC. TRANSLATA
HIC RECONDI CVRAVIT VI KAL. SEXTIL. A. M DCC XLII
NEREVS CARDINALIS FRATRIS FILIVS
Over his tomb, in the Cappella Corsini, a sumptuous marble and porphyry cenotaph was erected already in pontiff's lifetime. It was designed by Alessandro Galilei and executed by G. B. Maini and C. Monaldi. The cenotaph bears the following Latin inscription:
CLEMENS XII
PONT. MAX.
ANNO IV
OBIIT ANNO X.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


Cenotaph of Pope Clement XII. The tomb of Pope Leo XIII. ©ARB

23. Pope Leo XIII (+1903)

Provisionally buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1924 translated to the Basilica of St John Lateran and buried in the tomb erected in 1907, a work of Giulio Tadolini. The tomb bears a Latin inscription.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.



ROME, CHURCH OF SANT’IGNAZIO DI LOYOLA/ITALY
(Roma, Chiesa di Sant'Ignazio di Loyola, Via del Caravita 8a):
Pope Gregory XV (+1623)
Firstly buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1634 translated to the Church of Annunziata in Rome, where the papal coffin was kept awaiting the completion of the papal mausoleum in the Church of Sant'Ignazio di Loyola until the end of the century. Pope Gregory XV was buried in one of the most sumptuous mausoleums of Europe executed in an array of colourful marbles in a truly Baroque spirit. The tomb was designed by Orazio Grassi and executed by Pierre Le Gros the Younger and Pierre Étienne Monnot. On the sarcophagus of Gregory XV there is a Latin inscription reading:
GREGORIVS XV
PONT. MAX.
Together with the pope is buried cardinal Ludovico Ludovisi who had initiated the construction of the Church of Sant'Ignazio di Loyola.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


Rome, the Church of Sant'Ignazio di Loyola and the tomb of Pope Gregory XV. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF SAINT LAWRENCE OUTSIDE THE WALLS/ITALY
(Roma, Basilica di San Lorenzo fuori le Mura, Piazzale di San Lorenzo):
01. Pope Damasus II (+1048)
The tomb has not been preserved.

02. Pope Pius IX (+1878)
Firstly buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1881 translated to the Basilica of St Lawrence Outside the Walls and buried in the crypt in a marble sarcophagus executed by Pietro Longo. It bears Latin inscription which reads:
OSSA ET CINERES
PII PAPAE IX
VIXIT A. LXXXV IN PONT. A. XXXI M. VII D. XXII
ORATE PRO EO.
In 1956, during the beatification process, the remains of Pope Pius IX had been exhumed and later buried in a sarcophagus made of red marble and glass, making his mortal remains visible to all. The new tomb was placed in front of the old one.

Heart and viscera of Pope Pius IX were walled up in the Vatican Grottoes of St Peter's Basilica behind a plaque bearing the coat of arms of this pontiff.


Rome, the Basilica of St Lawrence and the tomb of Pope Pius IX. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF SANTA MARIA DEGLI ANGELI/ITALY
(Roma, Basilica di Santa Maria degli Angeli, Via Cernaia 9/Piazza della Repubblica):


Rome, the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli and the tomb of Pope Pius IV. ©ARB

Pope Pius IV (+1565)
Firstly buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1583 the remains of Pius IV were laid to rest in an inaccessible underground grotto behind the high altar of the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli. The site of papal interment is marked by a multicoloured marble slab representing his coat of arms and Latin inscription reading:
PIVS PAPA IIII.
On the neighbouring wall of the apse there is a Latin epitaph and a memorial featuring papal bust.


Pope Pius IV's epitaph and memorial in the Basilica of S. Maria degli Angeli. ©ARB



ROME, CHURCH OF SANTA MARIA DELL’ANIMA/ITALY
(Roma, Chiesa di Santa Maria dell'Anima, Via di Santa Maria dell'Anima 64):
Pope Adrian VI (+1523)
Firstly buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome, reburied shortly in the Church of Santa Maria dell'Anima in a mausoleum executed by Baldassarre Peruzzi, Michelangelo da Siena and Niccolò Tribolo. There is a Latin epitaph in the lower part of the monument.


Rome, the Church of Santa Maria dell'Anima and the tomb of Pope Adrian VI. ©ARB



ROME, CHURCH OF SANTA MARIA DI MONSERRATO/ITALY
(Roma, Chiesa di Santa Maria di Monserrato, Via di Monserrato):
01. Pope Callistus III (+1458)
Initially buried in the Rotunda of Santa Maria della Febbre adjacent to St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1485 a rich marble memorial was raised there by his nephew Rodrigo Borgia (the future Pope Alexander VI), executed by Paolino di Antonio da Binasco. With the demolition of the Rotunda in 1586, the remains of Pope Callistus III had been temporary transferred to St Peter's Basilica, while his tomb was dismantled (only the lid of his sarcophagus has been preserved in the Vatican Grottoes under St Peter's). Exhumed again in 1610 and translated to the Church of Santa Maria di Monserrato where the urn with papal remains was kept in the sacristy until 1889. In 1889 finally reburied in a double tomb (shared with Pope Alexander VI) executed by Filippo Moratilla in 1881.


The lid of the original tomb of Pope Callistus III kept in the Vatican Grottoes. ©ARB

02. Pope Alexander VI (+1503)
Initially buried in the Rotunda of Santa Maria della Febbre adjacent to St Peter's Basilica in Rome. With the demolition of the Rotunda in 1586, the remains of Pope Alexander VI had been temporary transferred to St Peter's Basilica and in 1610 and translated to the Church of Santa Maria di Monserrato where the urn with papal remains was kept in the sacristy until 1889. In 1889 reburied in a double tomb shared with Pope Callistus III.


Rome, the Church of Santa Maria di Monserrato and the tomb of popes Callistus III and Alexander VI. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF SANTA MARIA IN ARACOELI/ITALY
(Roma, Basilica di Santa Maria in Aracoeli, Piazza Campidoglio):
Pope Honorius IV (+1287)
Firstly buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome, but translated to the Basilica of Santa Maria in Aracoeli in 1545. His tomb, executed in 1288, is considered to be a work of Arnolfo di Cambio and Guglielmo da Pisa. The original Gothic canopy had been destroyed during restauration works in 1727 and replaced by the present one.


Rome, the Basilica of Santa Maria in Aracoeli and the tomb of Pope Honorius IV. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF SANTA MARIA IN TRASTEVERE/ITALY
(Roma, Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere, Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere):
Pope Innocent II (+1143)
Buried firstly in the Basilica of St John Lateran. Following the disastrous fire of the basilica in 1308, translated to the Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere. During the fire the porphyry sarcophagus in which the papal remains had been laid to rest, was damaged and the pope was interred in a simple tomb beneath a plain slab bearing Latin inscription in Gothic charcters. It has been preserved in the church. In 1657 the pope was reburied in another tomb. And finally in 1869 Pope Pius IX commissionned a new sarcopgahus for reburial of Pope Innocent II's remains. It was most probably executed according to Vespignani's design and it bears a Latin epitaph.


Rome, the Basilica of Santa Maria in Trastevere and the tomb of Pope Innocent II. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF SAINT MARY MAJOR
(Roma, Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, Piazza di Santa Maria Maggiore):


Rome, the Basilica of Saint Mary Major. ©ARB

01. Pope Honorius III (+1227)
The tomb has not been preserved.

02. Pope Nicholas IV (+1292)
Originaly interred under the pavement of the church. In 1572 during renovation works his coffin had been relocated and placed in the present marble tomb commissioned by cardinal Felice Peretti and executed by Domenico Fontana and Leonardo da Sarzana. The tomb feautres a seated effigy of the pontiff flanked by sculptures representing the Justice and the Truth. There is a Latin epitaph below the effigy of the pope.


Tombs of popes Nicholas IV and Pius V. ©ARB

03. Pope Pius V (+1572)
Provisionally buried in the Basilica of St Peter in Rome, but in 1583 translated to Saint Mary Major and buried in a lavish mausoleum executed by Domenico Fontana, Leonardo Sormani and Nicolas Cordier. Following cannonisation of Pius V his remains had been relocated and placed in a crystal coffin in front of his actual tomb for all to see.

04. Pope Sixtus V (+1590)
Provisionally buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome, but translated to the Basilica of Saint Mary Major in 1591 and buried in the marble mausoleum raised already in his lifetime. It had been executed by Domenico Fontana. There is a Latin epitaph on the tomb. The focal point of the mausoleum is a kneeling statue of the pope surrounded by five reliefs featuring, among others, the coronation of the pope, the cannonisation of St James and the peace between Poland and Austria.

His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb of Pope Sixtus V. Cenotaphs of popes Clement VIII and Paul V. ©ARB

05. Pope Clement VIII (+1605)
Buried firstly in St Peter's Basilica. Translated to the Basilica of Saint Mary Major in 1646 and buried in the Borghese Vault under the Cappella Paolina where his lavish marble memorial had been raised. It was designed by Flaminio Ponzio. In 1942 the simple papal coffin resting in the vault was placed in a porphyry sarcophagus with the following Latin inscription:
CLEMENS VIII PONT. MAX.
MDXXXVI HIPPOLYTVS ALDOBRANDINVS MDCV

06. Pope Paul V (+1621)
The lavish mausoleum of Pope Paul V, by Flaminio Ponzio, had been constructed already in pontiff's lifetime, but the pope was buried in a porphyry sarcophagus under the Cappella Paolina. His sacophagus bears the following Latin inscription:
PAVLVS V PONT. MAX.
MDLII CAMILLVS BVRGHESIVS MDCXXI
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb and the cenotaph of Pope Clement IX. ©ARB

07. Pope Clement IX (+1669)
Provisionally buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome and in 1680 translated to the Basilica of Saint Mary Major and interred there in a simple tomb under the church pavement. In the Cappella Paolina Pope Clement X had a sumptuous marble cenotaph raised for him, a work of Girolamo Rainaldi.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.



ROME, BASILICA OF SANTA MARIA SOPRA MINERVA/ITALY
(Roma, Basilica di Santa Maria sopra Minerva, Piazza della Minerva 42):


Rome, the Basilica of Santa Maria sopra Minerva. ©ARB

01. Pope Leo X (+1521)
Buried provisionally in St Peter's Basilica in Rome, in a simple brick tomb. In 1536 a lavish tomb of Pope Leo X was commissioned, representing a sitting life-size effigy of the pope flanked by the effigies of saints Peter and Paul. It was designed by Antonio da Sangallo the Younger and executed by Baccio Bandinelli and Lorenzo Lotti, known as il Lorenzetto. The tomb is anepigraph.

02. Pope Clement VII (+1534)
Buried provisionally in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1542 translated to the Basilica of Santa Maria Sopra Minerva and buried in a lavish tomb representing a sitting life-size effigy of the pope flanked by the effigies of saints Jerome and John the Baptist. The tomb was designed by Antonio da Sangallo the Younger and executed by Baccio Bandinelli. It is anepigraph.


Tombs of popes Leo X and Clement VII. ©ARB

03. Pope Paul IV (+1559)
Buried provisionally in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1566 translated to the Basilica of Santa Maria Sopra Minerva and buried in a lavish marble tomb, the work of Pirro Ligorio et al. The tomb bears a Latin inscription. Initially the statue of Pope Paul IV had been flanked by statues representing the Faith and the Religion, but these were later removed and placed in the sacristy.

04. Pope Urban VII (+1590)
Buried provisionally in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1606 translated to the Basilica of Santa Maria Sopra Minerva and buried in a lavish tomb representing a sitting life-size effigy of the pope by Ambrogio Bonvicino. There is a Latin inscription beneath the statue.

05. Pope Benedict XIII (+1730)
Buried provisionally in St Peter's Basilica in Rome. In 1738 translated to the Basilica of Santa Maria Sopra Minerva and buried in a provisional tomb. In 1768 reburied in a lavish marble tomb representing a sitting life-size effigy of the pope flanked by the statues representing the Purity and the Prayer. The tomb is a work of Carlo Marchionni, Pietro Bracci and Baccio Pincellotti. The following Latin inscription is placed beneath the statue of the deceased:
BENEDICTVS XIII VRSINVS
PONT. OPT. MAX.
EX ORDINE PRAEDICATORVM

Heart and viscera of Pope Benedict XIII were buried firstly together with those of Queen Christina of Sweden in the Vatican Grottoes of St Peter's Basilica. In the 1950s moved to another location (next to the Chapel of S. Maria de Pregnantibus), not accessible to visitors.


Tombs of popes Paul IV, Urban VII and Benedict XIII. ©ARB



ROME, BASILICA OF ST PAUL OUTSIDE THE WALLS
(Roma, Basilica di San Paolo fuori le mura, Via Ostiense 190):
01. Pope John XIII (+972)
The tomb has not been preserved. There is, however, a Latin epitaph of Pope John XIII, kept in the museum of St Paul's Basilica.

02. Pope John XVIII (+1009)
The tomb has not been preserved. A Latin epitaph of Pope John XIII is kept in the museum of St Paul's Basilica.


Rome, the Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls. ©ARB



ROME, ST PETER'S BASILICA (Roma, Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano, Piazza San Pietro/St Peter's Square):


Rome, St Peter's Basilica and the memorial listing all popes buried in the church. ©ARB

01.
Pope Stephen II [III] (+757)
The tomb has not been preserved.

02. Pope Paul I (+767)
Buried firstly in the Basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls, but shortly afterwards translated to St Peter's.
The tomb has not been preserved.

03. Pope Stephen III [IV] (+772)
The tomb has not been preserved.


The epitaph of Pope Adrian I. ©ARB

04. Pope Adrian I (+795)
The tomb has not been preserved. There is only his Latin epitaph left.


The tomb of popes Leo III and Leo IV. ©ARB

05. Pope Leo III (+816)
His burial site in the altar of Madonna della Colonna is marked by a marble plaque from 1607 commemorating the relocation of his remains. Buried with Pope Leo IV.

06. Pope Stephen IV [V] (+817)
The tomb has not been preserved.

07. Pope Paschal I (+824)
Probably buried firstly in the Basilica of St Praxedis in Rome and then translated to St Peter's.
The tomb has not been preserved.

08. Pope Eugene II (+827)
The tomb has not been preserved.

09. Pope Valentine (+827)
The tomb has not been preserved.

10. Pope Gregory IV (+844)
The tomb has not been preserved.

11. Pope Sergius II (+847)
The tomb has not been preserved.

12. Pope Leo IV (+855)
His burial site in the altar of Madonna della Colonna is marked by a marble plaque from 1607 commemorating the relocation of his remains. Buried with Pope Leo III.

13. Pope Benedict III (+858)
The tomb has not been preserved.

14. Pope Nicholas I the Great (+867)
The tomb has not been preserved. A piece of his epitaph is kept in the Vatican Grottoes.

15. Pope Adrian II (+872)
The tomb has not been preserved.

16. Pope John VIII (+882)
The tomb has not been preserved.

17. Pope Marinus I (+884)
The tomb has not been preserved.

18. Pope Stephen V [VI] (+891)
The tomb has not been preserved.

19. Pope Formosus (+896)
The tomb has not been preserved.

20. Pope Boniface VI (+896)
The tomb has not been preserved.

21. Pope Stephen VI [VII] (+897)
The tomb has not been preserved.

22. Pope Romanus (+897?)
The tomb has not been preserved.

23. Pope Theodore II (+897)
The tomb has not been preserved.

24. Pope John IX (+900)
The tomb has not been preserved.

25. Pope Benedict IV (+903)
The tomb has not been preserved.

26. Pope Sergius III (+911)
The tomb has not been preserved.

27. Pope Anastasius III (+913)
The tomb has not been preserved.

28. Pope Lando (+914)
The tomb has not been preserved.

29. Pope Leo VI (+928)
The tomb has not been preserved.

30. Pope Stephen VII [VIII] (+931)
The tomb has not been preserved.

31. Pope Leo VII (+939)
The tomb has not been preserved.

32. Pope Stephen VIII [IX] (+942)
The tomb has not been preserved.

33. Pope Marinus II (+946)
The tomb has not been preserved.

34. Pope Benedict VI (+974)
The tomb has not been preserved. The body of this pope had been thrown into the Tiber, but later supposedly buried in St Peter's basilica in Rome.

35. Pope John XIV (+984)
The tomb has not been preserved.

36. Pope John XV (+996)
The tomb has not been preserved.

37. Pope Gregory V (+999)
Buried in St Peter's Basilica. His remains had been exhumed in 1609 and reburied in an antique sarcophagus in the Vatican Grottoes under the basilica. There is a Latin epitaph above the sarcophagus.


The tomb of Pope Gregory V. ©ARB

38. Pope Benedict VIII (+1024)
The tomb has not been preserved.

39. Pope John XIX (+1032)
The tomb has not been preserved.


The tomb of Pope Leo IX. ©ARB

40. Pope Leo IX (+1054)
Buried in St Peter's Basilica. His remains had been exhumed in 1606 and reburied in a white marble sarcophagus placed under the altar of Saints Martial and Valeria (now St Joseph) with the following Latin inscription:
CORPVS SANCTI LEONIS PAPAE IX

41. Pope Urban II (+1099)
The tomb has not been preserved.

42. Pope Eugene III (+1153)
The tomb has not been preserved.

43. Pope Adrian IV (+1159)
Buried in St Peter's Basilica in a Roman sarcophagus. The tomb had been opened in 1606 and the papal remains were found inside it. The sarcophagus was placed in the Vatican Grottoes under the basilica. There is a Latin epitaph above the sarcophagus reading:
HADRIANVS PAPA IIII


Tombs of popes Adrian IV and Nicholas III. ©ARB

44. Pope Gregory IX (+1241)
The tomb has not been preserved.

45. Pope Celestine IV (+1241)
The tomb has not been preserved.

46. Pope Nicholas III (+1280)
Provisionally buried in the Chapel of St Nicholas. In 1285 reburied in a new mausoleum destroyed in 1620 during the demolition of the old St Peter's. Reburied in an early Christian sarcophagus in the Vatican Grottoes under the basilica. There is a Latin epitaph above it reading:
NICOLAVS PAPA TERTIVS
VRSINVS
RAYNALVS CARD. VERSINVS
RAYNALDVS VRSINVS SANCTI
HADRIANI DIAC. CARD HVIVS
BASIL. VATIC. ARCHIPRESB.

47. Pope Boniface VIII (+1303)
Initially buried in a marble mausoleum, a work of Arnolfo di Cambio. It had been destroyed during the demolition of the old St Peter's in 1605. Only the sarcophagus survived. It had been opened twice: in 1605 and in 1835 and the papal remains were found inside. Since 1605 it has been kept in the Vatican Grottoes under the basilica. There is a Latin inscription above the sarcophagus, reading:
BONIFACIVS
PAPA VIII
+


Tombs of popes Boniface VIII and Urban VI. ©ARB

48. Pope Urban VI (+1389)
The marble tomb of Pope Urban VI, commissioned by cardinal Martinus Brochanus, had been relocated a couple of times inside the old St Peter's until it was transferred in 1606 to the Vatican Grottoes under the basilica. There are two Latin inscriptions on the tomb:
VRBANVS PP VI
and beneath it in much smaller characters:
HIC IACET VRBANVS VI PONT. OPT. MAX.

49. Pope Boniface IX (+1404)
Buried firstly in a provisional tomb, in 1409 reburied in a mausoleum with marble sarcophagus commissioned by his brother Count Giovanni Tomacelli. The tomb has not been preserved. It was destroyed during the demolition of the old St Peter's around 1507.

50. Pope Innocent VII (+1406)
Originally buried under the pavement of the old St Peter's. In 1606 exhumed and reburied in the Vatican Grottoes in a sarcophagus using the original tombstone (featuring the effigy of Pope Innocent VII lying in state) as lid.


Tombs of popes Innocent VII and Nicholas V. ©ARB

51. Pope Nicholas V (+1455)
The marble mausoleum of Pope Nicholas V had been relocated inside St Peter's a couple of times, before it was demolished in 1606. Only the sarcophagus with its Latin epitaph has survived. It was moved to the Vatican Grottoes under the basilica in 1606.

52. Pope Paul II (+1471)
Buried in 1471 under the pavement of St Peter's Basilica. In 1474 reburied in lavish mausoleum executed by Mino da Fiesole and Giovanni Dalmata. In 1544 the mausoleum was relocated to another part of the basilica and much later to the Vatican Grottoes. It bears a Latin inscription.


Tombs of popes Paul II and Sixtus IV. ©ARB

53. Pope Sixtus IV (+1484)
Lavish bronze tomb of Pope Sixtus IV, executed in 1493 by Antonio del Pollaiolo, had been relocated within St Peter's basilica several times in the course of time. In 1922 it had been moved to a museum but later placed in the Vatican Grottoes. The remains of Pope Sixtus IV had been found and exhumed in 1926, and buried in a marble urn, interred under the pavement of St Peter's. There is a Latin inscription on the floor marking the site of his burial (he is buried together with Pope Julius II). The bronze tomb of Pope Sixtus IV is now kept at the Museo Storico Artistico del Tesoro di San Pietro, adjacent to St Peter's Basilica.


The tomb of Pope Innocent VIII. ©ARB

54. Pope Innocent VIII (+1492)
His tomb is the work of Antonio dell Polaiolo. It was executed in 1498 and bears a Latin inscription. The tomb has survived the demolition of the old St Peter's and was relocated into the new basilica in 1621. The remains of Pope Innocent VIII had been, however, lost during the process and are buried elsewhere in the basilica (the exact site is not known).

55. Pope Julius II (+1513)
Buried under the pavement of St Peter's together with Pope Sixtus IV under a simple slab with a Latin inscription.

A sumptuous tomb in the Basilica of St Peter in Vincoli (Rome) had been commissioned for Pope Julius II and executed by Michelangelo, who worked on it for four decades. The pope, however, was never buried there.

56. Pope Paul III (+1549)
Buried firstly in a provisional tomb in the old St Peter's Basilica. In 1574 translated to a new sumptous marble tomb, a work of Guglielmo della Porta. It bears a simple Latin inscription:
PAVLO III
FARNESIO PONT
OPT MAX


Tombs of popes Paul III and Julius III. ©ARB

57. Pope Julius III (+1555)
Originally buried in the old St Peter's, in 1608 his remains had been translated to the Vatican Grottoes and buried in an ancient sarcophagus. There are two identical Latin inscriptions on and above the sarcophagus:
IVLIVS PP. III

58. Pope Marcellus II (+1555)
Originally buried in a brick tomb inside the old St Peter's, in 1608 his remains had been translated to the Vatican Grottoes and buried in an ancient Christian sarcophagus with Latin inscription it:
MARCELLVS PP. II
There is another Latin inscription on the lid of the sarcophagus:
MARCELLVS II CERVINVS POLI
TIANVS PONT. MAX. SEDIT DIES XXII
VIXIT ANNOS LIV OBIIT KL. MAII MDLV


Tombs of popes Marcellus II and Gregory XIII. ©ARB

59. Pope Gregory XIII (+1585)
The original tomb of Pope Gregory XIII, designed by Ciro Ferri and executed by Prospero Antichi, had resembled quite a lot the present tomb of this pontiff by Camillo Rusconi, which replaced the previous monument in 1723. It features the pope sitting in his throne, in full regalia, giving blessing with his right hand. He is flanked by two sculptures impersonating the Religion and the Might. Below the sarcophagus, upon which the pontiff had his throne set, there is a Latin epitaph.

60. Pope Gregory XIV (+1591)
Buried in a simple marble tomb executed in 1842 and bearing the following Latin inscription:
GREGORIVS XIIII
PONT. MAX.


Tombs of popes Gregory XIV and Innocent IX. ©ARB

61. Pope Innocent IX (+1591)
Originally buried in the old St Peter's, in 1608 his remains had been translated to the Vatican Grottoes and buried in a simple marble sarcophagus. There are two identical Latin inscriptions on and above the sarcophagus, reading:
INNOCENTIVS PP. IX

62. Pope Leo XI (+1605)
The tomb of Pope Leo XI was executed four decades after his death by Alessandro Algardi, who sculpted the effigy of the pontiff and his sarcophagus, and by Giuseppe Peroni who is the author of the two figures impersonating the Prudence and the Generosity. On the sarcophagus there is a simple insciption in Latin: LEO XI. Below it there is Latin epitaph.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


Tombs of popes Leo XI and Urban VIII. ©ARB

63. Pope Urban VIII (+1644)
Buried in a lavish marble mausoleum by Bernini executed between 1623 and 1647. The tomb bears a simple Latin inscription:
VRBANVS VIII
BARBERINVS
PONT. MAX.

64. Pope Alexander VII (+1667)
The splendid mausoleum of Pope Alexander VII is an amazing display of colourful marbles and unusual forms they take, and certainly it is one of the most impressive papal tombs in Europe. The mausoleum had been designed by Bernini and it was executed between 1672 and 1678 by Gian Lorenzo, Lazzaro Morelli, Giuseppe Mazzuoli Giulio Cartari and Michele Maille. It bears a simple Latin inscription:
ALEXANDER VII
CHISIVS
PONT. MAX.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


Tombs of popes Alexander VII and Clement X. ©ARB

65. Pope Clement X (+1676)
The tomb of Pope Clement X is a work of Mattia de'Rossi, Ercole Ferrata, Giuseppe Mazzuoli, Lazzaro Morelli and Leonardo Reti. It shows the pope sitting in his throne in full regalia. His effigy is flanked by representations of the Kindness and the Charity. The Latin inscription on the tomb reads:
CLEMENS X
ALTERIVS ROMANVS
PONT. MAX.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb of Pope Innocent XI. ©ARB

66. Pope Innocent XI (+1689)
Originally buried in a marble mausoleum (now a cenotaph), commissionned by his nephew Livio Odescalchi, a work of Pierre-Étienne Monnot. In 1956, following the beatification of the pontiff, his remains were translated to a glass sarcophagus, designed by Francesco Vacchini, and placed under the altar of St Sebastian. There are the following inscriptions there:
B. INNOCENTIO XI PONT. MAX.
and
BEATUS

INNOCENTIUS XI
P. M.

His heart is kept in the Chapel of Palazzo Odescalchi in Rome.
His viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


Cenotaph of Pope Innocent XI. Tombs of popes Alexander VIII and Innocent XII. ©ARB

67. Pope Alexander VIII (+1691)
Buried firstly in a provisional tomb. Later reburied in the present tomb designed by Count Arrigo di San Martino and executed by Giuseppe Bertosi and Angelo De Rossi. The mausoleum consists of the bronze effigy of Pope Alexander VIII sitting above his marble sarcophagus dressed in full regalia. He is flanked by white marble figures representing the Religion and the Prudence. There is a Latin epitaph on the sarcophagus.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.

68. Pope Innocent XII (+1700)
After almost half of a century the remains of Pope Innocent XII were translated from his provisional tomb into the present one. The tomb had been designed by Ferdinando Fuga and executed by Filippo della Valle. It features the sitting pope dressed in full regalia, flanked by the effigies representing the Charity and the Justice. On his sarcophagus there is the following Latin inscription:
INNOCENTIUS XII
PIGNATTELLI

The heart of Pope Innocent XII had been originally buried in the Cathedral of St Januarius in Naples in a silver box laid inside a marble cenotaph featuring pope's bust supported by effigies ofa child and a woman sitting above the epitaph. The urn containg the heart of Pope Innocent XII was, however, stolen and never recovered.
His viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.

69. Pope Clement XI (+1721)
According to his wishes he was interred under the pavement of St Peter's in a simple tomb. The site of his burial is marked with a marble slab bearing a Latin inscription. His viscera were buried in the church of St Francis at Urbino.
His heart was buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb of Pope Innocent XIII. ©ARB

70. Pope Innocent XIII (+1724)
Originally buried inside St Peter's in a stucco tomb. In 1836 translated to the Vatican Grottoes and reburied in a simple sarcophagus with the following Latin inscription:
INNOCENTIVS XIII P. M.

The heart of this pontiff was walled up inside the church of Sanctuary in Mentorella sul Monte Guadagnolo behind a plaque with the following inscription:
COR INNOCENTII XIII DE COMITIBUS.

His viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.

71. Pope Benedict XIV (+1758)
Buried since 1769 in his present marble tomb executed by Pietro Bracci and Gaspare Sibilla. The tomb features the standing effigy of the pope dressed in full regalia. Below him there are representations of the Wisdom and the Despondency. There is the following Latin epitaph on his tomb:
BENEDICTO XIV
PONT. MAX.
S. R. E. CARDINALES
AB EO CREATI
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


Tombs of popes Benedict XIV and Clement XIII. ©ARB

72. Pope Clement XIII (+1769)
Following a short period of provisional interment, the remains of Pope Clement XIII were reburied in 1792 in a marble tomb, a masterpiece by Antonio Canova. The mausoleum consists of an effigy of the kneeling and praying pope placed just above his sarcophagus, bearing the following Latin inscription:
CLEMENTI XIII
REZZONICO
P. M.
FRATRIS FILII.
The white marble sarcophagus is flanked by sculptures representing the Religion and the Genius of the Death. Below them there are two lions resting.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb and the memorial to Pope Pius VI. ©ARB

73. Pope Pius VI (+1799)
Buried firstly in the cemetery of St Catherine in Valence, France, where he had been kept prisoner by Napoleon I. In 1802 his remains were translated to Rome and reburied in an ancient marble sarcophagus in the Vatican Grottoes. There is a Latin epitaph placed above the sarcophagus. A monument commemmorating this unfortunate pope, executed by Antonio Canova and Adamo Tadolini, was raised in the Vatican Grottoes in 1822.
His heart was buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.

Papal viscera had been firstly buried in the Roman Church of Ss. Vincenzo e Anastasio, but in 1803 on the request of the bishop of Valence, they were reburied in the Cathedral of Valence. In 1811 the viscera were placed in a marble tomb topped with the bust of the Pope by the French sculptor Maximilien Laboreur. There is a Latin insciption on the rear side of the monument.


The tomb of Pope Pius VII. ©ARB

74. Pope Pius VII (+1823)
Buried in a marble mausoleum executed by a Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen. The central figure of the mausoleum is the effigy of Pope Pius VII dressed in full regalia and sitting in his throne. He is flanked by representations of the Time and the History, below them two marble personifications of the Wisdom and the Might. There is the following Latin inscription betwwen them:
PIO VII CLARAMONTIO CAESENATI PONTIFICI MAXIMO
HERCVLES CARD. CONSALVI ROMANVS AB EO CREATVS
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


Memorial and the tomb of Pope Leo XII. ©ARB

75. Pope Leo XII (+1829)
He has been interred under the pavement of St Peter's. The site of his burial is marked by a simple marble plaque with Latin epitaph. A marble memorial commemorating this pontif had been commissioned by one of his successors, Pope Gregory XVI. It was executed in 1836 by Giuseppe Fabris and erected in the basilica in the following year. It bears the following Latin inscription:
MEMORIAE LEONIS XII P. M. GREGORIVS XVI P. M.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb of Pope Pius VIII. ©ARB

76. Pope Pius VIII (+1830)
Buried firstly in a provisional tomb. In 1857 reburied in a marble mausoleum, a work of Pietro Tenerani. It features the pope kneeing and praying. Above him there is Christ sitting in the throne flanked by St Peter and St Paul. The tomb bears the following Latin inscription:
PIO VIII PONTIFICI MAXIMO
IOSEPHVS ALBANIVS CARDINALIS
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.

77. Pope Gregory XVI (+1846)
Buried firstly in a provisional tomb. In 1853 reburied in a marble mausoleum, a work of Luigi Amici. It features the pope in full regalia sitting in his throne upon a sumptous sarcophagus with the following Latin inscription:
GREGORIO XVI PONT. MAX.
S. R. E. CARDINALES AB EO CREATI
ANNO MDCCCLIV
The sarcophagus is flanked by personifications of the Wisdom and the Prudence.
His heart and viscera were buried in the Church of Santi Vincenzo e Anastasio in Rome.


The tomb of Pope Gregory XVI. Cenotaphs of popes Pius X and Benedict XV ©ARB

78. Pope Pius X (+1914)
Buried firstly in the Vatican Grottoes in a white marble sarcophagus. In 1952, following his beatification, he was reburied in a glass sarcophagus, a work of F. Vacchini and Francesco Nagni, under the altar of the Presentation in the basilica. There is a simple Latin inscription on his tomb, reading:
S. Pius X P. M.
In 1923 a marble cenotaph featuring an effigy of Pope Pius X was erected in St Peter's. It was the work of Florestano di Fausto and Pier Enrico Astorri. There is a Latin epitaph on it.


Tombs of popes Pius X and Benedict XV. ©ARB

79. Pope Benedict XV (+1922)
Buried in the Vatican Grottoes in a yellow marble sarcophagus topped with a bronze effigy of the pontiff lying in state. The tomb is a work of sculptor Giulio Barbieri, executed in 1924. There is the following Latin inscription on the tomb:
BENEDICTVS XV P. M.
Inside the basilica the cenotaph of this pontiff, a work of Pietro Canonica, was erected in 1928. It is a beautiful composition of multicoloured marbles, featuring the effigy of kneeing and praying pope. It is placed above the sarcophagus with Latin inscription:
BENEDICTO XV
PONT. MAX.


The tomb of Pope Pius XI. ©ARB

80. Pope Pius XI (+1939)
Buried in the Vatican Grottoes in the sarcophagus featuring the pope lying in state, a work of Giannino Castiglioni (1941). The tomb is surrounded by the mosaics, depicting a portrait of Christ surmounted by two angels, designed by P. D'Achiardi. Above it there is Latin inscription:
REX REGVM, PRINCEPS PACIS.
In 1949 a monument to Pius XI was unveiled in the basilica, featuring a life-size effigy of this pontiff dressed in full regalia. It is a work of Pietro Cononica.

81. Pope Pius XII (+1958)
Buried in the Vatican Grottoes in a simple white marble sarcophagus bearing his name in Latin:
PIVS PP. XII
A monument to Pius XII, designed by Francesco Messina, was raised inside St Peter's in 1963.

82. Pope John XXIII (+1963)
Buried firstly in the Vactican Grottoes in three coffins placed in a travertine marble sarcophagus bearing the pontiff's name in Latin:
IOANNES PP XXIII.
Following his beatification the remains of Pope John XXIII were moved to the basilica in 2001 and buried in a glass coffin under the altar of St Jerome. The exhumation revealed the body of the potiff to be intact.


Tombs of popes John XXIII and Paul VI. ©ARB

83. Pope Paul VI (+1978)
According to his wishes buried in the Vatican Grottoes under a plain travertine slab bearing his name in Latin:
PAVLVS PP. VI
XP

84. Pope John Paul I (+1978)
Buried in the Vatican Grottoes in an elegant grey Greek marble sarcophagus, designed by Francesco Vacchini. It bears the pontiff's name in Latin flanked with two 15th c. reliefs of two standing angels:
IOANNES PAVLVS PP. I
XP


Tombs of popes John Paul I (+1978) and John Paul II the Great (+2005). ©ARB

85. Pope John Paul II the Great (+2005)
Buried in a cypress coffin, placed inside a zink coffin. These two coffins had been placed inside a bigger walnut coffin, with a small metal epitaph on its lid, which was interred under a plain white marble slab featuring his name in Latin and the dates of his reign:
IOANNES PAVLVS PP. II
16.X.1978-2.IV.2005
XP.
Following the beatification of Pope John Paul II in 2011 his coffin was moved to St Peter's Basilica to a new tomb.




ROME, CHURCH OF SAN SALVATORE IN LAURO/ITALY
(Roma, Chiesa di San Salvatore in Lauro, Piazza San Salvatore in Lauro 15):
Pope Eugene IV (+1447)
Buried in St Peter's Basilica in Rome in a marble tomb commissionned by his nephew, cardinal Pietro Barbo. It is attributed to Isaia da Pisa. Several years later the tomb was translated to the Roman Church of San Salvatore in Lauro. In 1873 when part of the church complex had been turned into barracks, a wall was erected around the tomb to save it from wanton destruction. The wall was removed in 1889. There are two Latin inscriptions on the tomb.


Rome, the Church of San Salvatore in Lauro and the tomb of Pope Eugene IV. ©ARB



SALERNO, BASILICA OF ST MATTHEW/ITALY
(Salerno, Basilica Cattedrale SS. Matteo e Gregorio Magno, Via Duomo 1):
Pope Gregory VII (+1085)
Originally buried in a marble Roman sarcophagus (now standing behind the new tomb of the Pontiff). The tomb was opened twice: in 1578 and in 1605. In 1954 the remains of Pope Gregory VII were translated to a new tomb made of silver, marble and glass, making his mortal remains visible to all.


The Basilica of St Matthew in Salerno and the tomb of Pope Gregory VII. ©ARB



UZESTE, COLLEGIATE CHURCH OF NOTRE-DAME/FRANCE (Uzeste, l'église collégiale Notre-Dame):
Pope Clement V (+1314)
The tomb has not been preserved. It had been destroyed in 1572, during the French Wars of Religion, by the Calvinists who looted the tomb and scattered papal remains. The original tomb had been executed in 1359. It contained an effigy of Pope Clement V surrounded by a Latin inscription.



VERONA, CATHEDRAL/ITALY (Verona, Duomo, Piazza Duomo 21):
Pope Lucius III (+1185)
Buried in front of the High Altar. The tomb was covered with a red marble slab featuring the papal effigy (executed in 1383). The slab had been considered lost until 1879 when it was discovered and placed on the wall on the right of the High Altar.


The Cathedral of Verona and cenotaph of Pope Lucius III. ©ARB



VILLENEUVE-LÈS-AVIGNON, THE CHURCH OF THE CARTHUSIAN MONASTERY/FRANCE
(Villeneuve-lès-Avignon, l'église de Chartreuse du Val-de-Bénédiction, Rue de la République):


Villneuve-lès-Avignon, the Carthusian Church and the tomb of Pope Innocent VI. ©ARB

Pope Innocent VI (+1362)
Buried in a Gothic sarcophagus with a canopy executed by Bartolomeo Cavalhier and Bertrand Nogayrol in 1361. In the 16th c., during the French Wars of Religion, the remains of Pope Innocent VI had been removed from the tomb and walled up in the church to save them from desecration by the Huguenots. The tomb had been damaged in 1790 by the French Jacobins, but restored in 1835.



VITERBO, CATHEDRAL OF ST LAWRENCE/ITALY (Viterbo, Cattedrale di San Lorenzo, Piazza San Lorenzo):
01. Pope Alexander IV (+1261)
The tomb has not been preserved. It was probably lost during extensive restauration of the Cathedral in 1490.

02. Pope John XXI (+1277)
Buried in a sarcophagus with Latin-Italian inscription (replacing an earlier Latin plaque) reading:
IOANNES PP XXI (MCCLXXVI-MCCLXXVII)
"PIETRO SPANO/LO QUAL GIÚ LUCE IN DODICI LIBELLI" (DANTE ALIGHIERI, PAR. XII).
In 1886 the remains of Pope John XXI had been translated to a new tomb commissionned by Duke of Saldanha, Portugal's envoy to the Holy See, and executed by Filippo Gnaccarini.


The Cathedral of Viterbo and the tomb of Pope John XXI. ©ARB



VITERBO, BASILICA OF ST FRANCIS/ITALY
(Viterbo, Basilica di San Francesco alla Rocca, Piazza San Francesco alla Rocca 6):


Viterbo, the Basilica of St Francis and the tomb of Pope Clement IV. ©ARB

01.
Pope Clement IV (+1268)
Originally buried in the Dominican Church in Viterbo. After a few years the tomb, executed by Pietro d'Oderisio (13th c.), had been translated to the Cathedral of Viterbo, but was returned to the Dominican Church already during the reign of Pope Gregory X. The tomb had remained in the Dominican Church until 1890, when it was for the last time translated to the Basilica of St Francis in Viterbo. The tomb was opened in 1885.
The tomb had been badly damaged during air raids in 1944, but renovated after the war. Three Latin memorial plaques, commemorating the Pontif, the renovation works in 1840 (sponsored by the French ambassador to the Holy See, Count De La Tour Maubourg) and another renovation in 1890 by the King of Italy Umberto I, had been destroyed during WW2 and replaced in 1949 by a simple Latin epitaph reading:
CLEMENS IV. PONT. MAX.
+29.XI.1268
REF. 1949.

02. Pope Adrian V (+1276)
The tomb of Pope Adrian V by Arnolfo di Cambio, had been damaged in an Allied air raid in 1944, but renovated in 1949. There are epitaphs in Latin on the wall over and next to the sarcophagus commemorating the Pontiff (a Mediaeval one and two other from 1714 and 1715), as well as a simple plaque in Italian commemorating the 1949 renovation.


The tomb of Pope Adrian V. ©ARB




Select Bibliography
Montini, R. U.: Le tombe dei papi, Roma 1957